Mexican Tribes

Indigenous tribes of Mexico

Tzeltal language

Tzeltal (or Ts’eltal) is a Mayan language spoken in the Mexican state of Chiapas, mostly in the municipalities of Ocosingo, Altamirano, Huixtán, Tenejapa, Yajalón, Chanal, Sitalá, Amatenango del Valle, Socoltenango, Villa las Rosas, Chilón, San Juan Cancun, San Cristóbal de las Casas and Oxchuc. It is a living language with some 371,730 speakers as of 2005, including a number of monolinguals, meaning that is the only language they speak. …Tzeltal language »»

Purépecha language

Purépecha was the main language of the pre-Columbian Tarascan state and became widespread in north western Mexico during its heyday in the late post-classic period (~ 1400-1521). It is a language isolate or small language family spoken by more than 100,000 P’urhépecha people in the highlands of the Mexican state of Michoacán. Even though it is spoken within the boundaries of Mesoamerica, Purépecha does not share many of the traits defining the Mesoamerican Linguistic Area, probably due to a long adherence to an isolationist policy. …Purépecha language »»

Chontal Maya language

Chontal Maya, also known as Yoko ochoco and Acalan, is a Maya language of the Cholan family spoken by the Chontal Maya people of the Mexican state of Tabasco. Chontal Maya is spoken in Nacajuca, Centla, El Centro, Jonuta, and Macuspana. There are at least three dialects, identified as Tamulté de las Sábanas Chontal, Buena Vista Chontal, and Miramar Chontal. …Chontal Maya language »»

Another Test

This is a test. …Another Test »»

Huave language

Huave (also spelled Wabe) is a language isolate spoken by the indigenous Huave people on the Pacific coast of the Mexican state of Oaxaca. The language is spoken in four villages on the Isthmus of Tehuantepec, in the southeast of the state, by around 18,000 people. …Huave language »»

Mayan Sign Language

Mayan Sign Language is a sign language used in Mexico and Guatemala by Mayan communities with unusually high numbers of deaf inhabitants.  In some instances, both hearing and deaf members of a village may use the sign language. It is unrelated to the national sign languages of Mexico (Mexican Sign Language) and Guatemala (Guatemalan Sign Language), as well as to the local spoken Mayan languages and Spanish. …Mayan Sign Language »»

Tzotzil language

Tzotzil (Bats’i k’opis a Maya language spoken by the indigenous Tzotzil Maya people in the Mexican state of Chiapas. According to a 2005 census, there are 329,937 speakers of Tzotzil in Mexico, making it the 6th most spoken indigenous language in the country. …Tzotzil language »»

Tequistlatecan languages

The Tequistlatecan languages are part the proposed Hokan family, but are often considered to be distinct family. Campbell and Oltrogge (1980) proposed that the Tequistlatecan languages may be related to Jicaquean (see Tolatecan), but this hypothesis has not been generally accepted.

…Tequistlatecan languages »»

Oto-Manguean Language


Oto-Manguean Language

The Oto-Manguean family has existed in southern Mexico at least since 2000 BCE and probably several thousand years before,some estimates using the controversial method of glottochronology suggest an approximate splitting date of Proto-Otomanguean at ca. 4400 BCE. This makes the Oto-Manguean family the language family of the Americas with the deepest time depth, as well as the oldest language family with evidence of tonal contrast in the proto-language. …Oto-Manguean Language »»

Mayan spiritual mythology

Here is a list, hopefully reasonably complete, of known Mayan God-forms. The information here is necessarily brief; a full accounting of all these entities would be a massive book in its own right. …Mayan spiritual mythology »»