Mexican Tribes

Indigenous tribes of Mexico

Ch’ol language

Ch’ol (or Chol) is a member of the western branch of the Mayan language family used by the Ch’ol people in the Mexican state of Chiapas. There are two main dialects:

  • Ch’ol of Tila spoken by 43,870 people of whom 10,000 are monolinguals in the villages of Tila, Vicente Guerrero, Chivalito and Limar in Chiapas.
  • Ch’ol of Tumbalá spoken by 90,000 people of whom 30,000 are monolinguals in the villages of Tumbalá, Sabanilla, Misijá, Limar, Chivalita and Vicente Guerrero.

…Ch’ol language »»

Seri language

Mexican Indigenous Languages -> Language Isolate -> Seri

The term Serian family may be used to refer to a language family with Seri as its only living member; related languages have disappeared in the last couple of centuries.

Attempts have been made to link it to the Yuman family, to the now-extinct Salinan language of California, and to the much larger hypothetical Hokan family. These hypotheses came out of a period when attempts were being made to group all of the languages of the Americas into families. In the case of Seri, however, very little evidence has ever been produced. Until such evidence is presented and evaluated, the language is most appropriately considered an isolate. …Seri language »»

Huave language

Huave (also spelled Wabe) is a language isolate spoken by the indigenous Huave people on the Pacific coast of the Mexican state of Oaxaca. The language is spoken in four villages on the Isthmus of Tehuantepec, in the southeast of the state, by around 18,000 people. …Huave language »»

Lacandon language

Lacandon is a Mayan language spoken by approximately 1200 Lacandon people in the state of Chiapas in Mexico. Native Lacandon speakers refer to their language as Jach t’aan or Hach t’an. A portion of the Lacandon people also speak Tzeltal, Chol, and Spanish. …Lacandon language »»

Mayan Calendars and Multiple Creation Phases

The Mayans have an unexpectedly large number of creator deities, and references to a number of different creations. Mayan creation history is very complex, and it is difficult to keep track of without supplementary material, such as an understanding of their calendar system. …Mayan Calendars and Multiple Creation Phases »»

Tequistlatecan languages

The Tequistlatecan languages are part the proposed Hokan family, but are often considered to be distinct family. Campbell and Oltrogge (1980) proposed that the Tequistlatecan languages may be related to Jicaquean (see Tolatecan), but this hypothesis has not been generally accepted.

…Tequistlatecan languages »»

Huastec language

The Wastek (Huastec) language is a Mayan language of Mexico, spoken by the Huastecs living in rural areas of San Luis Potosí and northern Veracruz. Though relatively isolated from them, it is related to the Mayan languages spoken further south and east in Mexico and Central America. …Huastec language »»

Purépecha language

Purépecha was the main language of the pre-Columbian Tarascan state and became widespread in north western Mexico during its heyday in the late post-classic period (~ 1400-1521). It is a language isolate or small language family spoken by more than 100,000 P’urhépecha people in the highlands of the Mexican state of Michoacán. Even though it is spoken within the boundaries of Mesoamerica, Purépecha does not share many of the traits defining the Mesoamerican Linguistic Area, probably due to a long adherence to an isolationist policy. …Purépecha language »»

Tzeltal language

Tzeltal (or Ts’eltal) is a Mayan language spoken in the Mexican state of Chiapas, mostly in the municipalities of Ocosingo, Altamirano, Huixtán, Tenejapa, Yajalón, Chanal, Sitalá, Amatenango del Valle, Socoltenango, Villa las Rosas, Chilón, San Juan Cancun, San Cristóbal de las Casas and Oxchuc. It is a living language with some 371,730 speakers as of 2005, including a number of monolinguals, meaning that is the only language they speak. …Tzeltal language »»

Mayan spiritual mythology

Here is a list, hopefully reasonably complete, of known Mayan God-forms. The information here is necessarily brief; a full accounting of all these entities would be a massive book in its own right. …Mayan spiritual mythology »»